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BHS baseball: Bemidji divides doubleheader with Duluth East

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The Bemidji Lumberjacks and Duluth East Greyhounds completed the abbreviated Des Sagedahl Invitational Saturday, dividing a twin bill under frigid conditions at the BSU Stadium.

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East had taken its Friday evening game in the rain 9-4 over Fargo North 9-4 while the Jacks-Fargo South game was cancelled.

South and North were due to open Saturday's four game card at 10 a.m.

But when temperatures were in the mid 30's with a strong northwest wind blowing. the North Dakota pair decided to go home.

With only Bemidji and East remaining, the two decided to play a double header.

Bemidji took the opener 8-1 and East the nightcap 9-1.

The games were remarkably similar.

In each game the winning team had 11 hits and the loser only four.

In each game one pitcher dominated the other team.

The split left Bemidji at 9-9 and East at 12-5.

The Jacks conclude their regular season Thursday at Moorhead hoping to switch the single game into a twin bill to make up postponements for both teams.

Chad Head will work one game with Tyler Tatro or Josh Kane possibly starting the nightcap.

Coach Mike Fogelson may use a number of his mound staff to ready them for the start of Sub-section play May 28 at Brainerd.

The Bemidji-Moorhead game or games will probably determine the No. 3 and 4 seeds with the fourth seed opening against Brainerd and the third against Alexandria.

The meet will be a double elimination with teams playing twice the first day and the three remaining teams squaring off May 30.

Simon Anderson was the show stopper in Saturday's opener, setting down East on four singles, fanning 10 and walking four,

It was his fourth win in five decisions. Bemidji made his task easier with a steady attack, bunching 10 of their 11 hits into three scoring innings.

They scored three in the second on a hit batter and singles by Cody Rutledge, Jeremiah Graves and Derek Lofgren.

'Two more crossed in the fifth on Matt Hietala's single, Sol Schneider's run-scoring double and a single by Anderson.

Another three scored in the sixth when singles by Rutledge, Tony Baumgartner and Graves loaded the bases with no outs. Tatro pinch hit and walked to force home one. The second scored on a wild pickoff play and the third on Schneider's sacrifice fly.

East scored an unearned run in the seventh.

Hietala had three hits and Rutledge and Graves two for the Jacks.

John Tisak, who left after four, drew the loss.

Reverse story

The second game was just the reverse as Max Tardy carried a three hitter into the seventh before tiring and yielded the reins to Mickey Keuning.

By that time, the game was well out of reach.

East scored four off Graves who lasted four innings, suffering his first loss in four decisions.

East scored twice in the third on a single, error and Parker Olson's double.

It scored twice more in the fourth on a double by Tisak, a walk and Tanner Murray's triple.

Tatro pitched the fifth, giving up one run on a walk, single and error.

Trevor Andrews worked the sixth, yielding two on a walk, hit batter and two singles.

Alex Hengel and Rutledge divided the seventh with another pair crossing on three opening singles and a force out.

Tanner Murray had three hits including a triple and double.

Olson, Tardy and Tisak had two. Bemidji's four singles came from as many different bats.

The spit gave East the tournament title at 2-1 to 1-1 for Bemidji and 0-1 for Fargo North.

Name to the all tournament team were Olin, Tardy, Olson, Zwak and Tanner Murray of East and Lofgren, Rutledge, Hietala, Schneider and Anderson from Bemidji.

The weather cancellations were the first in the meet's 11 year history.

The meet honors the memory of Bemidji High's long time baseball Coach Des Sagedahl who guided the Jacks for two decades.

A familiar face was on the sidelines with veteran Duluth TV sportscaster Bill Cortes the East the baseball assistant.

Cortes and the late Marsh Nelson dominated the Duluth TV sports scene for three decades.

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